Building your home mountain bike tool kit

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If you’re reading this, chances are you want to start doing some of your own bike maintenance, which is awesome! I think more riders should do more of their own bike repairs and tune-ups and have a home mountain bike tool kit stocked with the necessary basics.

Bike repair is actually quite easy once you put some time into understanding how mountain bikes are put together. Fixing your own bike is also way less expensive than bringing it into the shop every time you need to swap tires or adjust the shifting. Plus, you don’t have to be on the shop’s schedule to get riding again!

I know it can be a little intimidating to start wrenching on your most prized possession, but with a little help from YouTube I’m confident that you can do your own basic bike repairs. You will need to build up a mountain bike tool kit, though, so in this post, I go over what you’ll need to get started and a few more advanced tools if you want to really get your hands greasy.

Ready to wrench? Get started with basic home bike repairs with this guide on how to build your mountain bike tool kit!


Basic Mountain Bike Tool Kit Essentials

These are the tools that are essential if you want to do your own basic bike tune-ups and repairs. If you have these already and want to add more advanced tools to your home bike tool kit, skip to the bottom!

Bike stand

A bike stand isn’t necessary, but it will make your home bike repair life a whole lot easier. If you are really planning on diving into tune-ups and repairs, I highly recommend investing in a good bike stand. I have the Foundation Bike Repair Stand and it works great. It has a quick-release head so that you can snap your bike in and out of the clamp easily. It also comes with a tool tray to keep all your tools close by and organized as you tinker with your bike.

Foundation Bike Repair Stand // Learn the basic tools you need in your home mountain bike tool kit including wrenches, pumps, fluids, kits, and more.

Check price: Jenson

Long-handled Hex (aka allen) Wrench Set

A multi-tool with a range of Hex or Allen wrenches is great to throw into your pack for the trail, but if you want to work on your bike at home, having a set of long-handled hex wrenches in your mountain bike tool kit is essential. 90% of what you do on your bike will require a hex wrench. The long handle allows you to get a little more torque when you’re wrenching on pivots or pedals and the ball end allows you to insert the tool at odd-angles.

The Lezyne Hex Kit is a great, affordable option and it can be mounted to the wall. Another really popular set is the Park Tool P-Handle Set, but it’s more expensive and doesn’t travel well.

Lezyne hex kit // Learn the basic tools you need in your home mountain bike tool kit including wrenches, pumps, fluids, kits, and more.

Check price: Backcountry / Competitive Cyclist

3-Way Torx Wrench

You could invest in a full Torx wrench set like the Hex wrench set above, but honestly, you don’t really need to. Most mountain bikes only have one or two sizes of Torx screws which are usually found on brake rotors, brakes, derailleurs, handlebar clamps, etc…

\A 3-way Torx wrench like the Park Tool TWS-3 is a good and affordable choice for your mountain bike tool kit.

Torx wrench // Learn the basic tools you need in your home mountain bike tool kit including wrenches, pumps, fluids, kits, and more.

Check price: Backcountry / Jenson / REI

A multi-tool with a chainbreaker

In order to install a new chain, you’ll need a chain breaker. Most multi-tools come with a chain breaker and they work great. So if you already have a multi-tool like the Crank Brothers Multi-19, just use that (pro tip: you should always have a multi-tool with a chain breaker in your pack!). There are chain breaker tools that just break chains, but they’re not necessary unless you plan on breaking A LOT of chains (i.e. you work in a shop).

Another non-essential, but maybe good-to-have in your bike tool kit are master link pliers. These tools allow you ‘break’ the chain by unsnapping the master link. The only real situation where I think these would be useful in addition to a multi-tool chain breaker, though, is when/if you want to remove your chain to clean it and then put the chain back on.

Multi-tool // Learn the basic tools you need in your home mountain bike tool kit including wrenches, pumps, fluids, kits, and more.

Check price: Backcountry / Jenson / Competitive Cyclist

Floor pump with an air tank reservoir

If you run tubeless tires (which you should if you are a mountain biker), then you’ll need a floor pump with an air tank reservoir for when it’s time to swap tires. Tubeless tires are exactly what they sound like – tires without inner tubes. Instead, they have 1-2 ounces of tire sealant inside them that will seal up small holes and punctures.

Since switching to tubeless tires a few years ago, the number of flats I’ve gotten has gone waayyy down. But in order to install tubeless tires, you’ll need a pump that can hold air in a separate tank. If you try to pump up new tires without blasting them with a rush of air, you won’t get anywhere and the tires won’t seat. The Lezyne Pressure Over Drive is my top choice for floor pumps.

Lezyne Pressure Drive Pump // Learn the basic tools you need in your home mountain bike tool kit including wrenches, pumps, fluids, kits, and more.

Check price: Jenson / Backcountry

Valve core remover

A valve core remover is a small but mighty tool to add to your mountain bike tool kit (it’s also a super helpful thing to carry in your trail pack). This little tool allows you to remove the valve core from your valve stem and also tighten it back on. Why is this necessary? You’ll need to remove the core when you swap tubeless tires and you’ll also need to remove and replace the core when it gets all gunked up with old tire sealant.

(Pro tip: if you can’t pump up your tires, chances are the valve core is plugged and it’s time to put a new one in).

Valve core tool // Learn the basic tools you need in your home mountain bike tool kit including wrenches, pumps, fluids, kits, and more.

Check price: Jenson

Shock pump

A shock pump is definitely a mountain bike tool kit necessity. Some new bikes come with a shock pump in the box and others don’t. Why do you need one? Because setting your suspension to the correct PSI is one of the most important things you can do to make your bike feel smooth and nimble.

There are tons of YouTube videos out there that will help you set up your fork and rear shock according to your weight. It’s pretty simple once you get an idea of what to do and you’ll need a shock pump to do it. The Fox Digital Shock Pump is my choice (yes, it will work on RockShox) or if you’re looking for something a bit more budget-friendly the Fox Analog Shop Pump is also great.

Shock pump // Learn the basic tools you need in your home mountain bike tool kit including wrenches, pumps, fluids, kits, and more.

Check price: Jenson

Rags

You’ll need lots of rags. Use them to clean chains, wipe off stanchions, collect grease if you’re doing a lower fork service, or wipe your hands after swapping pedals. Using old t-shirts works great, or these shop rags are awesome.


Mountain bike tool kit fluids & lubricants

Tire sealant

If you’re going to be swapping your own tubeless tires, you’ll need some tire sealant and an injector. There are tons of YouTube videos like this one that will walk you through how to install a new tubeless tire.

There are two main tire sealant brands out there: Orange Seal and Stan’s NoTube. I think Orange Seal is the superior sealant and can seal holes and punctures more quickly and efficiently than Stan’s. However, it does tend to plug up valve cores quicker.

Stan’s NoTubes, on the other hand, may not be as powerful, but you won’t be fighting plugged valve cores as often, which honestly are super cheap and easy to replace anyway. If you get Stan’s NoTube be sure to get the injector as well.

Stans NoTube // Learn the basic tools you need in your home mountain bike tool kit including wrenches, pumps, fluids, kits, and more.

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Jenson / Backcountry / Competitive Cyclist

Orange Seal // Learn the basic tools you need in your home mountain bike tool kit including wrenches, pumps, fluids, kits, and more.

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Jenson / Backcountry / Competitive Cyclist

Chain Lube

There are so many different options for chain lube out there and there’s really no ‘best’ product. It all depends on where you ride (for example, wet vs dry conditions), how much you ride, and personal preference.

That being said, we use Rock n’ Roll lube, which is one of the most popular chain lubes out there. The Rock n’ Roll Gold is great for dusty, dry conditions but needs to be applied frequently. The Blue Extreme is good in all conditions and lasts forever, but it does leave residue on your drive train.

RocknRoll Gold // Learn the basic tools you need in your home mountain bike tool kit including wrenches, pumps, fluids, kits, and more.

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Jenson / Backcountry / Amazon

RocknRoll Extreme // Learn the basic tools you need in your home mountain bike tool kit including wrenches, pumps, fluids, kits, and more.

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Jenson / Backcountry / Amazon

Maxima SC1

My boyfriend swears by this stuff. It helps protect stanchions and seat posts from dust and grime build-up and extends the life of fork and shock seals. He sprays Maxima SC1 on our stanchions and seat posts before almost every ride and then lightly wipes it off with a rag. A bike tool kit necessity? No… but it can help extend the life of your shock seals and make your fork and seat post feel super smooth.

Maxima SC1 // Learn the basic tools you need in your home mountain bike tool kit including wrenches, pumps, fluids, kits, and more.

Check price: Jenson / Amazon

Grease

You’ll need grease for cleaning pivots, bearings, and other components. Pretty much every moving part on your bike should be cleaned regularly and lubed with fresh grease. You can’t go wrong with Park Tool PPL-2 Polylube 1000 Grease. (Note: servicing forks and shocks require a different kind of grease).

Park tool grease // Learn the basic tools you need in your home mountain bike tool kit including wrenches, pumps, fluids, kits, and more.

Check price: Jenson / Backcountry / Amazon

Loctite

Loctite is used to keep bolts and screws from coming loose with every jolt and rattle. It shouldn’t be used on every bolt on your bike, but it’s good for certain bolts/screws like suspension and pivot hardware and brake rotors – things that don’t need adjusting or removing frequently. Bikes will come with Loctite already applied in these areas, but if you want to clean or swap components it’s good to have a bottle of medium strength Loctite in your bike tool kit.

Loctite // Learn the basic tools you need in your home mountain bike tool kit including wrenches, pumps, fluids, kits, and more.

Check price: Jenson / Amazon

Isopropyl Alcohol

Isopropyl alcohol is great for cleaning brake rotors, suspension parts, and wiping up oil after brake bleeds or fork services. It’s basically rubbing alcohol but look for one that is at least 90% isopropyl alcohol. This is not for actually cleaning your bike, think of it more as a way to remove unwanted oils from components to keep them clean and lasting a long time.

Isopropyl Alcohol // Learn the basic tools you need in your home mountain bike tool kit including wrenches, pumps, fluids, kits, and more.

Check price: Amazon

Bike Wash

If you do want to give your bike a wash, the Muc-Off Nano Tech Bike Cleaner is a favorite. Washing your bike not only keeps it looking good, but it can also help prolong the lifespan of your components by keeping them rust and grime-free. Simply spray it on your bike (everywhere!), let it sit for a few minutes, and then wipe it off with a rag or sponge.

Muc-off // Learn the basic tools you need in your home mountain bike tool kit including wrenches, pumps, fluids, kits, and more.

Check price: Backcountry / Jenson / Competitive Cyclist


Complete mountain bike tool kits

If you want to buy a complete mountain bike tool kit that includes all the basic (and sometimes more advanced tools) you need for home mountain bike maintenance, there are several options out there.

The Foundations Standard Bike Tool Kit is a great entry-level mountain bike tool kit at an affordable price. If you need/want even more tools and gold-star quality, the Park Tools PK-5 Professional Tool Kit includes pretty much every tool a professional bike shop would need.

Foundations Bike Tool Kit // Learn the basic tools you need in your home mountain bike tool kit including wrenches, pumps, fluids, kits, and more.

Check price: Jenson


Advanced Mountain Bike Tool Kit Add-ons

The tools and products above will allow you to do pretty any basic bike repair or maintenance at home. If you want to start getting into more advanced bike maintenance like brake bleeds, lower fork services, and replacing cassettes, then you’ll need some more advanced tools. Keep in mind that a lot of bikes require their own special tools, so don’t make the mistake of thinking ‘one-size-fits-all’. Be sure to do some research on what tools/fluids your specific bike requires before making any purchases.

Brake Bleed Kit & fluid

Doing your own brake bleeds can save time and money at the bike shop. Depending on how much you ride, what kind of riding you’re doing, and what kind of brakes you have, brakes will need to be bled at least once a year (and oftentimes more!). Home brake bleeds aren’t as scary as they sound, but I definitely recommend watching a YouTube video several times before attempting to do your own.

Also, note that brake bleed kits are specific to brake systems. Sram and Shimano use different brake fluids, so you really don’t want to confuse the two.

SRAM Brake Bleed Kit // Learn the basic tools you need in your home mountain bike tool kit including wrenches, pumps, fluids, kits, and more.

Sram Brake Bleed Kit

Shimano brake bleed kit // Learn the basic tools you need in your home mountain bike tool kit including wrenches, pumps, fluids, kits, and more.

Shimano Brake Bleed Kit

Chain Whip & Cassette Lockring tool

If you want to replace your cassette, you’ll need a chain whip and cassette lockring tool. It’s a pretty easy process and there are lots of YouTube videos out there explaining how to use these tools to remove and replace your cassette. Here are the two tools you’ll need for your mountain bike tool kit:

Chain whip tool // Learn the basic tools you need in your home mountain bike tool kit including wrenches, pumps, fluids, kits, and more.

Chain Whip Tool

Cassette lockring tool // Learn the basic tools you need in your home mountain bike tool kit including wrenches, pumps, fluids, kits, and more.

Cassette Lockring Tool

Bottom Bracket Tool

If you’re really, really keen on doing ALL of your bike maintenance at home, you’ll need a bottom bracket tool to grease and/or replace your bottom bracket. The problem is that there are so many different bottom bracket sizes that you need to find the right bottom bracket tool (BBT) that will fit your bike.

A little bit of googling and research should land you in the right place or you can ask the mechanic at your friendly local bike shop.


Basic Bike Maintenance Classes

In addition to YouTube (which is honestly great for learning basic bike maintenance), there are a few other places you can hone your home bike mechanic skills.

  • GMBN – These are my go-to guys on YouTube for anything home bike repair or maintenance. Their videos are detailed, professional, and cover pretty much any maintenance or repair topic you could ever need!
  • Park Tool School – Park Tools has teamed up with local bike shops around the country to provide training and classes for local communities. Use the Park Tool School Locator to find events and programs near you.
  • Mike’s Bikes – If you live in the Bay Area of California, Mike’s Bikes offers free Tuesday night tech clinics.

This is a pretty comprehensive list to build your own home mountain bike tool kit, but don’t feel like you need to buy it all in one go! If you’re just starting out with bike repair and maintenance all you really need is a good set of Hex wrenches. You can do 90% of your maintenance and repair with these. Once you get comfortable fiddling with your bike, slowly add in more tools and products.

Are you starting to build your own mountain bike tool kit? What questions do you still have or what tools did I leave out? Do you have any favorites? Drop a comment below!

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